Tag Archives: Baxu and the Giants

#BaxuOnNetflix: ‘Baxu and the Giants’ Is Officially On Netflix And NamTwitter Is Here For It

Florian Schott’s short film Baxu and the Giants made its Netflix debut on 30 September 2020, which means every Namibian with a Netflix account and good internet connection finally has the opportunity to see the much celebrated film.

Baxu and the Giants is already a favourite with international festivalgoers and curators, since it’s premiere on the streaming service, it has been widely received by Namibian audiences who took to Twitter to share their excitement.

Here are some of the best reactions to Baxu and the Giants‘ Netflix premiere:

https://twitter.com/hotbunions/status/1311184411396911104?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Related: Film Review: ‘Baxu and the Giants’

https://twitter.com/Kinashaaa/status/1311100181862023172?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

And please, no spoilers

Baxu and the Giants had its world premiere in September 2019 and has since received various accolades and performed well with audiences and critics alike.

Baxu and the Giants Soars To Netflix

Florian Schott’s Baxu and the Giants is the first Namibian film to soon start showing on the popular streaming service, Netflix.

The 29-minute long film will be available on the streaming service from 30 September 2020.

According to Scott, the Netflix deal came about through one of the Film Festivals Baxu and the Giants took part in. Particularly the RapidLion International Film Festival hosted in March in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Apart from earning the Best Humanitarian Film nomination at the festival, Baxu and the Giants impressed one particular sales agent as well.

“I attended the festival with my wife and Production Coordinator Cherlien Schott and Karl Ehlers, one of our composers. At the festival, I had a meeting with a South African Sales Agent who watched Baxu and the Giants and as we stayed in touch they heard that Netflix was looking for African Shorts and that they were apparently interested in Baxu and the Giants,” Schott says.

Schott says while delivering the film to Netflix’s technical specs took a bit of time, they are “super happy that it all came together and our film will be available on Netflix soon.”

“Of course, it’s a huge honour to be the director of the first Namibian film on Netflix but the congratulations really need to go out to the whole Crew, especially Girley Jazama and Andrew Botelle, and of course our star Camilla Jo-Ann Daries,” Schott says.

A scene from Baxu and the Giants (2019) (Images: baxuandthegiants.com)

Jo-Ann Daries won the Best Female Actress Award for depicting the 10-year old Baxu at the Namibian Theatre and Film Awards 2019. Equally, the film itself is loved by local and international audiences, having received numerous accolades here and overseas.

“I am confident that this is just the first of many Namibian productions on Netflix,” Schott adds. “And a huge opportunity for Namibian filmmakers to showcase their films around the world.”

On 27 August 2020, the first official soundtrack of Baxu and the Giants was released to the public. The beautiful single ‘Sada Di Tama Hâ’ by Lize Ehlers, Cherlien Schott, Karl Ehlers (LOFT) and Imms Nicolau feat. Camilla Jo-Ann Daries comes with an awesome video that was directed by Girley Jazama, who co-wrote the script of Baxu and the Giants. ‘Sada Di Tama Hâ’ directly translates to ‘not ours’ in Khoekhoegowab.

“As we got multiple requests to release the music from the film we’ll do that in the coming days as well,” the director says.

Watch ‘Sada Di Tama Hâ’

‘Baxu and the Giants’ available to stream globally

Multiple award-winning Namibian short film Baxu and the Giants, telling the story of how Rhino poaching triggers social change in rural Namibia, will be available globally to stream and download for free starting 20 March 2020.

The 29-minute film follows Baxu, a 9-year old girl who is in touch with nature and tradition but toughened by life in poverty, lives with her older brother Khata and an alcoholic grandmother in a village in Damaraland, Namibia.

Over the last six months, Baxu and the Giants screened in ten countries around the world, at over 20 Film Festivals and won multiple international awards, including the Award for Best Foreign Narrative at the San Francisco Independent Short Film Festival, three Namibian Theatre- and Film Awards (including Best Female Actor for 10-year-old Camilla Jo-Ann Daries), two international Cinematography Awards and two awards at the Knysna Film Festival in South Africa.

Just in the last few weeks, director Florian Schott presented the film to over 500 school children in Los Angeles as part of the Pan African Film Festival and at the RapidLion Film Festival in Johannesburg, where the film was also nominated for ‘Best Humanitarian Film’.

In addition to that, the Legal Assistance started showing the film to thousands of learners all across Namibia and MaMoKoBo Video & Research is busy bringing the film to all corners of Namibia via mobile screenings, in partnership with the Save the Rhino Trust and the Ministry of Environment & Tourism.

Baxu and the Giants will be available to stream on the official website as well as on YouTube and Vimeo.

The film is produced by Andrew Botelle (The Power Stone, Born in Etosha), directed and co/written by Schott (Katutura) and co-produced/co-written by Girley Jazama (The White Line).

‘Baxu and The Giants’ Comes Back To Windhoek In February

Florian Schott’s award-winning short film Baxu and the Giants will have its first Namibian public screening for the year at the DHPS Auditorium, on Thursday, 6 February, for free.

Additionally, the Legal Assistance Centre and MaMoKoBo Video & Research will host a series of screenings at schools in Windhoek, including other free screenings for the public in Windhoek.

Later in the year, the film will also be screened in villages north-west of Namibia, where the film was shot, including in the coast.

All of these screenings will lead up to the Global Release of Baxu and the Giants in mid-March. At this time the film will not only be available on DVD but also for streaming worldwide via YouTube and Vimeo.

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Director Florian Schott with actors Camilla Jo-Ann Daries and Wafeeq /Narimab (Image: Opas Onucheyo)

International Festivals where Baxu and the Giants will be screening in the coming two months include the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles, the Toronto Black Film Festival, the Children’s Film Festival Seattle and the RapidLion International Film Festival in South Africa.

The Namibian short which premiered in September 2019 already screened in nine countries and won multiple international awards, including the Award for Best Foreign Narrative at the San Francisco Independent Short Film Festival, three Namibian Theatre- and Film Awards (including Best Female Actor for 10-year-old Camilla Jo-Ann Daries), two international Cinematography Awards and two Awards at the Knysna Film Festival in South Africa.

Baxu and the Giants tells the story of how rhino poaching triggers social change in a village in rural Namibia, seen through the eyes of a nine-year-old girl. Producer Andrew Botelle (The Power Stone, Born in Etosha) enlisted Director and Co-Writer Florian Schott (Katutura) and Co-Producer/Co-Writer Girley Jazama (The White Line) to craft an emotional story around rhino poaching.

Visit baxuandthegiants.com for more.

‘Baxu And The Giants’ Receives International Acclaim

Director Florian Schott’s short film, Baxu and the Giants, had its world premiere in September 2019 and has already won awards for Best Foreign Narrative in San Francisco, 3 Namibian Theatre & Film Awards (Best Female Actor, Best Editing, Best Production Design), 2 monthly international Cinematography Awards (at the Canadian Cinematography Awards and the European Cinematography Awards) and 2 Awards at the Knysna Film Festival for Best Cinematography for a Short Film and Best Supporting Actor for a Short Film.

The film is proving to be favourite with international film festivals having already screened at the San Francisco Independent Short Film Festival in the United States, the Wallachia International Film Festival in Romania, and the Knysna Film Festival in neighbouring South Africa.

Next week, the film will screen at the 2019 Africa International Film Festival (AFRIFF) in Nigeria. According to Schott, Baxu and the Giants has confirmed screenings at the AfryKamera African Film Festival in Poland in December 2019, at the Barbados Independent Film Festival in January 2020, at the Cape Town International Film Market & Festival in October 2020 as well as screenings in Los Angeles and Silicon Valley in the USA sometime in 2020 and still awaiting a number of decisions from various film festivals around the globe.

Schott talks more about the international success of the film:

Baxu and the Giants is doing really well internationally, with three international wins so far. Why do you think the film is performing so well?

I had the privilege to watch the film with audiences in three different countries so far and everywhere we go our story really seems to connect emotionally with the people watching it. I think that no matter where you come from you can easily understand Baxu’s motivations and connect with her moral dilemma.

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The film has screened at a number of festivals and is scheduled to screen at more festivals over the next few months. What is the importance of film festivals, for you as a filmmaker and for Baxu and the Giants as an anti-rhino poaching activism piece?

Our strategy for this film was always two-fold.  First, bring the film to Namibian audiences, especially children and teenagers. We are busy planning this right now. Bringing the film to schools, do more public screenings all around the country and show the film villages that are most affected by Rhino poaching. Secondly, we want to raise awareness on the issue of rhino poaching of Namibia. In travelling with the film to festivals we chat to audiences about the importance of conservation and the urgency of this issue. Next to this – for me as a filmmaker – these film festivals are great places to showcase Namibian film, to network, to watch independent cinema from around the world and to chat to potential partners when it comes to distribution but also potential future projects.

Related: Review: Baxu and the Giants

You have done a number of films, where would you place Baxu and the Giants in terms of success compared to your other films?

This is such a difficult question. I think all of my films had very different goals, so it’s almost impossible to compare them. For Everything Happens for a Reason I was just glad that people were interested in the film, and I had a bit of financial success with it, winning the Afrinolly Short Film Competition in Nigeria. Katutura probably had the biggest impact when it comes to expectations for a Namibian film. I think our biggest success with that was proving clearly that Namibian audiences are interested in watching well-made Namibian stories if you give them the chance to. Baxu and the Giants is really well received, both in Namibia and internationally, and I hope that this film can be a part in making a real difference in the fight against rhino poaching. And it hopefully inspires other filmmakers to think of the youth and children as potential audiences for their stories.  But as I mentioned, it’s almost impossible to compare.  I am very happy with the reception of all of my films.

“It’s very comforting that you share the experience of being an independent filmmaker with so many other filmmakers from around the world.” – Florian Schott

Overall, has the response to Baxu and the Giants stacked up to your expectations?

Yes, it actually went way beyond my expectations. We did foresee a positive response from a Namibian audience but the international response, especially from children and teenagers both in Namibia and outside of the country, the way people identify with Baxu and her story, is really beautiful.

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Cherlien Schott, Jo-Ann Daries, Florian Schott, Girley Jazama and Andrew Botelle (producer) receiving awards at Knysna Film Festival. (Image: Facebook)

You have travelled to a number of countries with the film. Is there something you’ve learned about films you’d like to share?

As a filmmaker, you learn a bit with every film you watch, every conversation you have with fellow filmmakers and I am privileged to be able to watch a lot of films that are not available in cinemas or online at these festivals. It’s very comforting that you share the experience of being an independent filmmaker, with all its struggles – especially in terms of development, budget and distribution – with so many other filmmakers from around the world.

So, Baxu and the Giants is enjoying international attention now, coming back to Namibia, are there any plans to show the film in other towns other than Windhoek?

Yes. We have two more public screenings in Windhoek planned, optimally this year still.
The Legal Assistance Centre (LAC) already brought the film to various schools around the country and we are busy putting a plan together to bring the film to all corners of Namibia in 2020.

Baxu and the Giants follows Baxu (Jo-Ann Daries), a 9-year old girl who is in touch with nature and tradition but toughened by life in poverty, lives with her older brother Khata (Wafeeq /Narimab) and their alcoholic grandmother (Anna Louw) in a village in Damaraland, Namibia. Schott co-wrote the film with Girley Jazama.

Film Review: ‘Baxu and the Giants’

Director: Florian Schott
Screenplay: Florian Schott & Girley Jazama
Cast: Camilla Jo-Ann Daries, Wafeeq /Narimab, Anna Louw, Robert Hara#gaeb, West Uarije, Steven Afrikaner, Ashwyn Mberi

Rating: ★★★★

If you were worried Baxu and the Giants is an overhyped, terrible film, don’t be, because  Baxu and the Giants is a remarkable short film that lives up to its expectation.

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Camilla Jo-Ann Daries and Wafeeq /Narimab in Baxu and the Giants. (Image: Baxu and the Giants)

This emotional 29-minute long short film directed by Florian Schott follows 9-year old !ubaxu (Camilla Jo-Ann Daries), who lives in impoverished Damaraland with her alcoholic grandmother (Anna Louw) and older brother Khata (Wafeeq /Narimab). Khata is offered a ‘golden’ opportunity involving rhino poaching by his neighbour (Robert Hara#gaeb). Khata affords his family an easier lifestyle by being involved in rhino poaching.

When looking at the synopsis, one could more or less predict the ending to Baxu and the Giants, however, the film has a sincerity challenging us not to dismiss it, thanks largely to exceptional acting capabilities by its charming 10-year-old lead, Daries and her co-stars and the film’s production value. Daries literally breaks into her first role by delivering her character with the contentment, empathy and curiosity of a child, which allows her to effectively bring out the emotional core of the film.

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Camilla Jo-Ann Daries and Anna Louw in Baxu and the Giants (Image: Baxu and the Giants)

While allowing us to witness the daily reality of rhino poaching, Schott and his co-writer Girley Jazama moulded the characters of Baxu and the Giants into real people who are easily identifiable and not just plothole fillers. Baxu’s deep relationship with wildlife is highlighted through recurring dreams Baxu has of King Rhino (voiced by Ashywn Mberi) warning her about her brother’s wrongdoing. These moments are perfectly devised in live-action animation.

Director of Photography Kit Hoffmann and Editor Robert Scott made sure the film delivers good camera and editing work from the opening with an epic cross-cut scene of the time of the hunter-gatherers falling in-sync with prehistoric rock paintings, leading up to the very end.

With the most interior scenes shot in Windhoek, set design by Tanya Stroh convincingly helped in telling the story of a poor north-western Namibia household. Despite some inept acting moments from conversations between Khata and Baxu, Baxu and the Giants is a good quality short film with a positive message.

The film is produced by Andrew Botelle and executively produced by Willem Odendaal (Legal Assistance Namibia).

‘Baxu & The Giants’ Releases Trailer Ahead Of September 19th Premiere

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Director Florian Schott with actors Camilla Jo-Ann Daries and Wafeeq /Narimab (Image: Opas Onucheyo)

Namibian short film Baxu and the Giants follows Baxu (Jo-Ann Daries), a 9-year old girl who is in touch with nature and tradition but toughened by life in poverty, lives with her older brother Khata (Wafeeq /Narimab) and their alcoholic grandmother (late Anna Louw) in a village in Damaraland, Namibia.

Baxu and the Giants will have its Namibian premiere on 19 September 2019 at Ster Kinekor Grove Mall, Windhoek. Tickets to the premiere are N$60.

Baxu and the Giants was commissioned by the Legal Assistance Centre with the aim of sensitising teenagers to the issue of poaching in Namibia.

Producer Andrew Botelle (The Power Stone, Born in Etosha) enlisted Director and Co-Writer Florian Schott (Katutura) and Co-Producer/Co-Writer Girley Jazama (The White Line) to craft an emotional story out of this difficult issue of poaching.

Here is the official trailer of the film:

Related: ‘Baxu And The Giants’ To Have World Premiere At San Francisco Independent Short Film Festival.

‘Baxu And The Giants’ To Have World Premiere At San Francisco Independent Short Film Festival

Florian Schott’s short film, Baxu and the Giants will have its world premiere at the 2019 San Francisco Independent Short Film Festival. The festival is scheduled to run from 13 to 15 September at the New People Cinema, in Japantown, San Francisco.

Baxu and the Giants will be part of the festival’s ‘The Kids Are All Right?’ program which features films about kids on 14 September.

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Camilla Jo-Ann Daries as Baxu in ‘Baxu and the Giants’ (Image: Facebook/Baxu and the Giants)

The 29-minute film follows Baxu, a 9-year old girl who is in touch with nature and tradition but toughened by life in poverty, lives with her older brother Khata and an alcoholic grandmother in a village in Damaraland, Namibia. The film is themed around rhino poaching.

Schott said that while it is great that especially this year there are multiple Namibian films coming out, it is also important that Namibian filmmakers are afforded the chance to show them outside of the country.

“There is a high demand worldwide now for African content and us Namibian filmmakers should be a part of this conversation,” Schott said. “Our experiences and stories aren’t any less valid than the ones from Nigeria or South Africa.”

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Schott expressed gratitude on being afforded the opportunity to play a part in shining a light on the difficult issue surrounding rhino poaching to American audiences. “We will continue working hard on bringing the film and message out into the world. Doing what we can as filmmakers to make a change and help in the fight against rhino poaching.”

Baxu and the Giants will be screened alongside Dekel Berenson’s Ashima, June Hucko’s BettaAmber Sealey’s How Does It Start, Dana-Lee Mierowsky Bennett’s Sammy and Mariona Lloreta’s The Moon Never Dies.

The film will have its Namibian premiere on 19 September at Grove Mall, Windhoek.

Florian Schott Talks Upcoming Short Film ‘Baxu and the Giants’

From the Director of the award-winning feature film, Katutura comes a new live-action short film on rhino poaching and social change.

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Florian Schott

Florian Schott’s new short film, Baxu and the Giants is a story on how rhino poaching triggers a social change in a village in Damaraland, told through the eyes of an 8-year-old girl, Baxu, who is in touch with nature and her own heritage. The name Baxu is short for “!ubaxu”, which means ‘I come from the soil’.

According to Schott, the film highlights poaching and social issues in the surrounding communities. Schott adds that the film comes with a sense of poetry in the imagery; the music and the way the young hero tells her story, taking the audience from time of hunters and gatherers to modern-day.

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Damaraland by Florian Schott

“There will be elements of magical realism in the story as there will be dream sequences and parts of the story being narrated by our young hero but the story itself will be told in a very realistic way,” Schott says.

Related: Florian Schott: A Filmmaker With Passion And Drive

When the Legal Assistance Center commissioned Andrew Botelle from MaMoKoBo Video & Research to produce a film with the aim of sensitizing teenagers to the issue of poaching in rural Namibia, Schott and his co-writer Girley Jazama took up the opportunity to tell this story from the inside out; through the eyes of an innocent but toughened-by-life girl.

“Through this storytelling device, the aim is to reach an audience worldwide and for audiences to understand some of the underlying social issues in rural Namibia that can lead to poaching”

Baxu and The Giant will premiere on 19 September 2019.

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